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50 Cent arrested driving his Murcielago in NYC

Discussion in 'Lamborghini Discussion (not model specific)' started by WILLIAM H, Sep 9, 2006.

  1. Blackbird4life

    Blackbird4life Karting

    Jul 8, 2005
    104
    So 50 was speeding so fast that he had time to talk on the phone and greet people......in MANHATTAN NY.
     
  2. dream34

    dream34 Rookie

    May 31, 2005
    10
    New Orleans, La.
    Well dude I hate to break it to you but (as somebody already stated) operating a vehicle without a visible license plate, no registration, no driver's license on your person, and no proof of insurance is a jailable offense in most states. If you don't like it then perhaps you should write your elected represenatives and petition them to change the law.

    Now if I'm getting this right they stopped him for making an illegal lane change, NOT for being "black" and driving a nice car. To that effect he WAS stopped for a legitimate violation of the traffic ordinance and one, might I add, that is the cause of MANY traffic accidents. My guess is that while you think that cops pulling over people for this type of offense is bull****, you would be the first guy crying if some jackass made an illegal lane change and smashed into your vehicle. Hell, you would probably be going ballistic and "demanding" the cops cite the guy.

    Anyway once they pulled ol "fiddy" over for a legitimate violation he decides to mouth off, all the time knowing he is in further violation because he does not have the proper insurance documents and/or a driver's license in his possession. Further he does not even have a license plate affixed to the vehicle, but I guess you have a way to excuse that too, huh. At any rate I'm guessing "fiddy" started mouthing off because he KNEW he was not in possession of the proper documents, was going to jail, and just did not give a F**K, but whatever. Now, "fiddy" not having registration documents may have been the fault of Unique not giving him the items, but not having a driver's license and proof of insurance is on him. Further, if he knew he did not have the documents then why the hell was he driving the car in the first place?

    Cry all you want, but the stop was legitimate, as was the cops dragging his ghetto arse to jail. Perhaps in the future he'll know better, but I seriously dobut it.
     
  3. Lip Service

    Lip Service Rookie

    Dec 16, 2005
    9
    For fiddy years :D
     
  4. PAP 348

    PAP 348 Moderator
    Moderator

    Dec 10, 2005
    0
    Mount Isa, Australia
    Full Name:
    Pap
    4 shizzle my nizzle.:eek::eek:
     
  5. racerx

    racerx Guest

    Nov 23, 2003
    38
    I watched 2 videos of this event and fiddy acted cool and calm considering the BS he was put thru. Unless you were there you should base your argument on known facts.

    BUT coming from NO it is no surprise. NOPD is the worst in the country, actually doing hits for local dealers. I'm just glad that there is and will continue to be more video recording devices and distribution methods so we clean up all the scum in the world.
     
  6. alanhenson

    alanhenson Rookie

    Dec 2, 2003
    43
    Where the hell in Manhattan can you speed? They would have to lock up every cab driver in the city if they were arresting him for improper lane changes.
     
  7. 8 SNAKE

    8 SNAKE Rookie

    Jan 5, 2006
    23
    Springfield, MO
    Full Name:
    Mike
    I would be curious to see how reactions would change if 50 would have been ticketed, had his car towed and been left on the street. What if he would have gotten injured or assaulted after the police had "abandoned" him after taking his car? I would place a large wager that the same people crying foul for him being hauled in would be screaming discrimination for leaving him stranded on the street to fend for himself.
     
  8. 8 SNAKE

    8 SNAKE Rookie

    Jan 5, 2006
    23
    Springfield, MO
    Full Name:
    Mike
    Yep, it definitely wasn't the lane change that earned him a chauffeur ride downtown, it was the lack of a license plate, insurance, registration and valid driver's license.
     
  9. noahlh

    noahlh Karting

    Aug 28, 2003
    62
    NYC, NY
    Full Name:
    Noah
    Another thing to remember is that every jurisdiction has different rules about what is an "arrestable" offense. In NYC, driving w/o a license or with an expired/suspended licenses is indeed an arrestable offence, regardless of what the penalty is.

    A customer of mine had the misfortune of forgetting to pay a traffic ticket, getting his license suspended, and learning about it the hard way when going through a late-night checkpoint downtown one night. No DUI, no other issues, just pull over - license check - suspended - jail for the night. Period. He walked out the next morning pissed off and with a minor traffic ticket.

    nlh
     
  10. SrfCity

    SrfCity Rookie

    Nov 1, 2003
    0
    Orange County, CA
    Can we get a ruling on this from Rev. Jesse Jackson? :)
     
  11. racerx

    racerx Guest

    Nov 23, 2003
    38

    TAXI

    (i think he could afford it.)
     
  12. 8 SNAKE

    8 SNAKE Rookie

    Jan 5, 2006
    23
    Springfield, MO
    Full Name:
    Mike
    That was not my point, as I'm sure you are well aware.
     
  13. zjpj

    zjpj Rookie

    Nov 4, 2003
    0
    USA
    But shouldn't affirmative action be extended to traffic violations? Black people driving without a license and registration shouldn't be arrested like everyone else. This system is seriously RACIST! :mad: :rolleyes:
     
  14. twk63

    twk63 Rookie
    BANNED

    Nov 11, 2005
    42
    You have the attitude of a complete arsehole. Do you really talk to people like that? Belittle them for not attending college? Pretty bold and foolish attitude for an idiot attending a third-rate school on Dad's dime. Some value system you seem to have learned from your parents.

    I am Ivy-league educated, Harvard MBA, Wall Street pedigree and I make more in a week than you will in 5 years coming out of UFlorida. My Porsche is a 996TT Cab, not a Boxster, and I NEVER, EVER, EVER belittle someone for doing a menial job simply because they have not had the advantages in life I have enjoyed. I give people the respect they deserve until they prove otherwise, as you just have.

    You are not one-tenth the man that those police who put their lives on the line to protect the rest of us are. I suggest you do a great deal of soul-searching before you graduate, junior. You need a serious attitude readjustment.

    Tell you what, next time I am down in my home in Sailfish Point, you can come over and I will have a few Martin County Sheriffs Deputies on hand. You can tell them how inferior they are to an "educated man" such as yourself.
     
  15. Blackbird4life

    Blackbird4life Karting

    Jul 8, 2005
    104
    Settle down angry white man. Do you which minority reaps the most benefits off of AA? Tell me if do you/ or find out.

    And like ShowcaseC6 said most people pulling the race card aren't black, 50 is a rapper, like Paris is a social elite...pull that card out when Bill Cosby or Bill Gates gets pulled over.
     
  16. REMIX

    REMIX Rookie

    May 25, 2005
    0
    Jacksonville & Sarasota

    Cut him some slack, twk. He *is* a college student, and all college students listen to rap, watch MTV and think these rappers are something special. The media propogates this myth and most white college kids buy into it lock, stock and barrel. I mean, in what other country would a convicted crack dealer who has been shot nine times become a role model for kids? 50 Cent, from what I can surmise, has never held an honest job in his life. In light of this, why shouldn't we believe him over a couple of working guys who put their lives on the line every single day?

    RMX
     
  17. Alxlee

    Alxlee Formula Junior

    Apr 8, 2002
    391
    Wilmington, DE
    Full Name:
    Alex Lee
    No license, no reg, no insurance...chances are you're going to jail and your car towed. Why? Because in the American legal system if he were to wreck and hurt/kill someone after the cops let him go, you already know who's going to end up with a lawsuit against them. Not 50.

    As for the gun comment...I believe it was the handcuffs he was reaching for. If it was the gun, I'd do it too. I seem to recall him being arrested for having a couple concealed guns on him at one time.

    You never know what to expect...here's and example:
    http://www.officer.com/article/article.jsp?siteSection=2&id=32569
     
  18. twk63

    twk63 Rookie
    BANNED

    Nov 11, 2005
    42
    It is not his adoration of a loser like 50 cent that upsets me, it is his condascending attitude towards others who don't have the same educational opportunities as him (such as they are).

    If you look at his record, he is attending a third-rate public university following his graduation from a third-rate high school. He is scarcely in a position to be belittling others, ESPECIALLY those whose career choice puts them in harms way for the benefit of the rest of us.

    He is a loser, going nowhere in life, who has the unmitigated gall to make comments of staggering naivity and breathtaking stupidity.
     
  19. wbaeumer

    wbaeumer Formula 3
    Consultant

    Mar 4, 2005
    1,140
    Hey folks - let`s cool down, pleasze!

    Mr. Cent has the right to make money in a legal business and he can throw it around for whatever he likes. I am pretty sure that he was not busted for reasons we can call RACISM. But if he made an error - it has to be checked by the cops! They are doing their job - which is quite risky in our days. Perhaps they also are over-reacting. Humans we all are! Mr. Cent has to respect the law which was made for everybody. If he made a stupid error - he has to face the consequences! As we all have to do!

    And now: BACK TO CARS!!

    Ciao!
    Walter
     
  20. Blackbird4life

    Blackbird4life Karting

    Jul 8, 2005
    104
    I rather not. This thread is interesting.

    RMX asked how a rapper like 50 becomes a role to kids after being a convicted crack dealer. And I can't forget the fact that he was shot 9 times. (But hit with 3 if you didnt know)

    Let's look at Forbes view.


    Curtis Jackson's Chevy Suburban swerves in and out of New York City gridlock with the grace of a cement mixer. Grace is compromised when a nondescript black SUV is tricked out with 5 tons of steel armor, a bombproof undercarriage, bulletproof windows and run-flat tires that keep rolling even after getting shot up by an Uzi. Jackson, age 30 and better known as hard-core rapper Fifty Cent to millions of fans around the world who are far younger than you, bought the $200,000 monster last year, straight off the assembly line on its way to Iraq. He leaves the driving to a professional trained in the kind of evasive maneuvers more commonly deployed in war zones.

    The safe-room on wheels is both a marketing prop and a necessary defense system for Jackson. He grew up hard in a violent, crack-wracked neighborhood in the Borough of Queens, his drug-dealing mother murdered when he was 8. By age 11 he was reselling cocaine, by 19 he had three convictions and in 2000, at 25, he endured the infamous incident that almost ended his life--and then ignited his career: He got shot nine times, as he recounts in several of his songs.

    Jackson, Fifty or Fitty to friends and fans, has parlayed this tragic and troubling résumé of street credibility into a thriving business. He earned $41 million last year, and he ranks No. 8 on the Forbes Celebrity 100 list, on a scorecard that counts earnings, in addition to Internet, TV, radio and print exposure. Though he dropped out of high school as a teenager and never went to college, he has emerged as a masterful brand-builder and a shrewd businessman. With keen advice from a seasoned industry insider (his manager, Chris Lighty of Violator Management & Records), Fifty aims to build a multipronged franchise that will last long after his music fades from the charts.

    His name and related efforts sparked sales of at least half a billion dollars to date from a panoply of pursuits--the bestselling CD of 2005 (8 million copies), the bestselling ringtones of the year (3.2 million downloads), a budding career as an actor, a Reebok sneaker line, hip-hop apparel, a videogame, music publishing, his own label with a roster of rap protégés and more.

    "I'm creating a foundation that will be around for a long time, because fame can come and go or get lost in the lifestyle and the splurging," Fifty says. "I never got into it for the music. I got into it for the business."

    Many music stars before him went bankrupt: Mick Fleetwood of Fleetwood Mac in the 1970s, Jerry Lee Lewis in the 1980s, female R&B stars TLC and rapper M.C. Hammer in the 1990s. Fifty vows this won't happen to him. "What are the chances I'll go bankrupt?" he says, surprised this comes up at all. "Nearly impossible." His manager, Lighty, adds: "I'm about building branded empires, but this is a dictatorship. Fifty tells me what he wants, and I make it work."

    Fifty's worldwide success (last month he did concerts in Tel Aviv, Beirut and Moscow) outrages his many detractors. They lament the riches reaped by an ex-thug whose profane oeuvre celebrates violent crime, contempt for women, raw sex, marijuana and gunplay. (His second album, The Massacre, opens with a fusillade of some 50 gunshots and a woman's screams, then unleashes a torrent of incendiary "disses" to rival rappers.) After Reebok signed him in 2003, a frequent Fifty critic, Bill O'Reilly, host of The O'Reilly Factor on Fox News, declared on-air: "If Lucifer or Beelzebub could sell shoes, [they'd] hire him, too?"

    Yet Fifty's rough image got him here. His two albums have sold over 20 million discs worldwide in spite of their graphic realism--or more likely because of it. And the threatening facade, these days, is more marketing than reality. In person, despite his imposing 6-foot frame and bulging biceps from daily workouts, he is polite, soft-spoken, thoughtful. He insists he lives a quiet life, rarely goes out partying, won't use narcotics or smoke pot (despite his ode to weed, "High All the Time") and eschews alcohol. Onstage, he guzzles from a Hennessy bottle. His fans don't know it holds only iced tea.

    The rap star, moreover, also plies a message of belief in God, hard work and wealth creation, his rhymes extolling Mercedes-Benz, Gucci, Hennessy, Dom Perignon and dozens of other brand icons--prospective marketing clients all. The title of his first CD: Get Rich or Die Tryin'. "The name said it all," says his producer, known as Sha Money XL, also president of Fifty's G-Unit Records. "That's what he stood for: Do or die. There was no Plan B."

    "My show brought me the dough/that bought me all my fancy things/my crib, my cars, my clothes, my jewels," the rapper says in his huge hit "In Da Club." Now, however, Fifty Cent is trapped by the image he so rigorously cultivated, trailed by a violent history he can't seem to keep in the past. "The threats on his life are very real. Remember, he's only a few years out of the 'hood," says his attorney, Theodor Sedlmayer.

    Last year the star was doing a live radio interview at the upstairs studio of a New York radio station when gunfire erupted at street level outside. The media played it as a Fifty fiasco, though Lighty says, "We were all upstairs, it had nothing to do with us. But we got smacked with it anyway." Says Fifty: "My past is my shadow everywhere I go. All I have to do is be close to a violent thing, a shooting, and they say, 'Well, you know Fifty Cent--he's violent.'"

    He believes his outlaw image hurt ticket sales last year for his autobiographical film, also named Get Rich or Die Tryin'. Yet his fans and critics alike expect the tough-guy act. When he goes against type, it flops: His song "God Gave Me Style," a sweet and unprofane paean, "got overlooked," he says. "You become typecast. If you go off and write something different that people don't expect, bye-bye. It's easier to just make the material people like."

    Curtis Jackson started out without musical ambitions. "I've never been obsessed with it." He honed his business acumen dealing drugs on the mean streets of South Jamaica, N.Y., where he mastered profit margins and expenses, distribution, supply chains and, well, labor relations. (To coax street-corner dealers into hawking his dope, he offered good discounts--and the threat of a good beating.)

    His mom was only 15 when he was born, and she left him in the care of her mother, Beulah Jackson. Beulah called him Boo-Boo, and he still calls her Mom; she now lives in a $1.4 million home he bought for her on Long Island. Early on his uncles would dispatch him to pick up cocaine, and by age 11 he was charging a markup: $125 for what had cost him $100, he recounts in his ghostwritten autobiography From Pieces to Weight. By junior high he was supplying resellers twice his age. In his freshman year he got caught with crack and got 18 months of probation. A short time later he got busted again and did 22 months in a Brooklyn rehab program. He was arrested a third time, at age 19, and he avoided a nine-year prison sentence by doing six months in a military-style boot camp in upstate New York. (He earned his high school equivalency diploma there.) He got out and started dealing again, and by age 21 was cruising Queens in a white Mercedes.

    And then, a break: His car caught the eye of a famed rap pioneer, Jason "Jam Master Jay" Mizell of Run D.M.C. Mizell invited him to pen some lyrics, then signed Jackson to his label. A few months later Jackson picked a stage name--one that stirred fear in hip-hop circles: Fifty Cent, cribbed from a murdered Brooklyn drug lord (Kelvin Martin) who, as the original Fifty Cent, had robbed several rappers.

    Several months later Columbia Records signed him for $65,000, and Fifty turned most of it over to Mizell to get out of their deal. (Mizell was shot and killed in 2002.) At Columbia Fifty recorded "How to Rob," a putdown of bigger rappers that got him noticed, prompting superstar Sean "Jay-Z" Carter to retort on stage: "I'm about a dollar, what the **** is Fifty Cent?" That bolstered Fifty's legitimacy.

    But just as his debut album, Power of the Dollar, was about to come out, Fifty was ambushed outside his grandmother's home and gunned down. (Weeks later the shooter was shot and killed; Fifty denies any involvement.) Columbia dropped him a short time later.

    Fifty recuperated in Pennsylvania, moving in with his then-girlfriend and their young son, Marquise, now age 10. Fearing for his life, he wasn't sure how he could return to a recording studio safely. "He literally had a bounty on his head," recalls Sha Money XL, who offered the rapper a secure haven in his basement recording studio where they laid down tracks for party "mix tapes." Their hallmark was Fifty's husky grotto voice, a result of getting shot in the face. His circle of cronies, which he dubbed G-Unit (now a brand extension), provided security, and he began wearing a bulletproof vest in public.

    The mix tapes generated a Fifty following, and by 2002 he had offers from Universal Music and Jive Records. But rap phenom Eminem overheard a tape being played by his driver and learned of Fifty's street "rep" as a reckless thug. He and his producer, Andre "Dr. Dre" Young, flew Fifty to Los Angeles to see for themselves. They were disarmed by his soft-spoken style; when Dre offered champagne, Fifty declined. They signed him that weekend to a $1 million, five-album contract, in partnership with Interscope Records.

    Fifty spent his first $300,000 registering Fifty Cent and G-Unit trademarks. The rest he used to set up his own label, G-Unit Records, signing up rappers from his protective posse. Thus even as Interscope and Eminem and Dre would own Fifty's first five CDs, he had moved to own the output of a roster of new rappers. G-Unit now is a profit center for Fifty, selling 8.9 million albums to date.

    In 2003 Fifty hired Chris Lighty, a New York manager for hip-hop notables Missy Elliott and Busta Rhymes, to manage the G-Unit brand. First stop: Hollywood. Eminem's rap-bio film, 8 Mile, had just hit $240 million in ticket sales, and Fifty dispatched Lighty to Los Angeles to land a talent agent. (Lighty signed up William Morris.)

    Lighty also courted endorsement offers, though he encouraged Fifty to reject one from Bowflex Fitness, an exercise equipment brand, even though it would have paid the rapper $13 per unit sold. Lighty, mindful of Sean "Diddy" Combs' embarrassing infomercial for an acne remedy, persuaded his boss that the product might compromise Fifty's image.

    More promising was a $2 million deal they signed in 2003 with Zingy, a ringtone provider, although cellular carriers chafed at plans for a videogame called Free Yayo. Tony Yayo is one of Fifty's G-Unit rappers--but, it turns out, Yayo also is slang for cocaine. Only Cingular picked it up.

    Meanwhile, Fifty, who fancies Armani suits, also wanted to build a clothing label. In the spring of 2003 Lighty secured a licensing deal with Manhattan hip-hop clothier Ecko Unlimited to handle G-Unit Clothing. Fifty involves himself in the details, even picking denim washes and logo fonts. The G-Unit line, sold at Macy's and the like, brought in sales of $55 million the first year, on which Fifty takes a royalty cut of at least 8%. A few months later Reebok paid the rapper $20 million to license a G-Unit sneaker line, priced on par with Jay-Z's Reebok series. But Fifty Cent balked at the $100-a-pair price, saying it would price-out some of his fan base, and Reebok cut it to $80. The rapper also insisted the line include actual fitness sneakers and that the color scheme match the G-Unit logo. At least 4 million pairs of G-Unit sneakers have been sold.
    The rapper then plowed some of the windfall into a steal of a real estate deal: He bought a 50-room mansion in the Hartford, Conn. suburb of Farmington. He got it from the financially troubled former heavyweight champ, Mike Tyson. Fifty boasts that Tyson paid $12 million for it in the late 1990s and sold it to Fifty for $4 million in 2003--and that today it is appraised at $20 million.

    In 2004 Fifty and Lighty diversified into water. He hooked up with a Queens firm, Glacéau VitaminWater, letting it sell a flavor named for him--Formula 50--in exchange for a small equity stake in the company. Glacéau sponsored "Hydrate or Die Tryin'" tailgate parties at the rapper's Anger Management tour last year. Fifty likens the company to a small record label that gets acquired by a giant; build this firm, he says, and one day it could get bought by, say, Coke.

    By last year the rapper had turned to acting, persuaded by Interscope chairman Jimmy Iovine to star in the biopic of his life. Promotional posters pictured a pistol-toting Fifty Cent, sparking complaints from antigun protesters. The film's studio, Viacom (nyse : VIA - news - people )'s Paramount, pulled down offending billboards near Los Angeles schools. Fifty's film also got hurt on opening weekend, when a patron was shot in a theater in Philadelphia. The movie took in a disappointing $46 million at the box office. But he has gone on to play a supporting role in a military movie starring Samuel Jackson; and currently he is exercising even more than usual to drop 15 pounds for a role as a middleweight in a boxing flick, in which he will star opposite the actor Nicolas Cage.

    Fifty's third album is due this Christmas, hyped perhaps by a branding deal in the works with Apple (nasdaq: AAPL - news - people ) Computer for a line of affordable computers aimed at inner-city customers. "I control the business, I make the decisions," says Fifty Cent, who dreams of joining the Forbes 400. "If I fail, it'll be my fault."


    Rap Sheet
    All told, Fifty Cent's portfolio has amassed $500 million in sales, netting him at least $41 million last year alone.
     
  21. REMIX

    REMIX Rookie

    May 25, 2005
    0
    Jacksonville & Sarasota
    Well, I hoped you would have sensed my sarcasm. This attitude's fairly prevalent in that age group.

    RMX
     
  22. CSchienerUF

    CSchienerUF Rookie

    Oct 20, 2004
    41
    Gainesville, Florida
    Full Name:
    Christopher Schiener

    Check who you are calling an areshole first. That was one post I made. I wrote with some anger recalling an incident in which I was wrongly treated by some police officers.

    My mother's husband is a cop and a good man. I don't have a beef with all cops or all of anything. Put some cops are pigs, other cops are indeed heroes. You don't need to go to college or make a lot of money to be a good person (as I stated earlier Mr. Hastey).

    And I don't know where you get this third rate stuff from, UF is a tier one school on the US News and world report and is ahead of many private schools including UMiami.

    You obviously made the same mistake I made writing while still angry. I'm sorry for my mistake whether you are or not doesn't matter to me. I'm proud of all I have done and all that I have.
     
  23. CSchienerUF

    CSchienerUF Rookie

    Oct 20, 2004
    41
    Gainesville, Florida
    Full Name:
    Christopher Schiener
    FYI

    I don't watch mtv and I don't like rap. I do however, love to play devil's advocate and I'm not a huge fan of most authority figueres. That's why I take the position with 50 cent.

    I'm a classic rock fan to the core.
     
  24. Blackbird4life

    Blackbird4life Karting

    Jul 8, 2005
    104
    Sorry I dont mean to get on ya case, but if I ask white college kids if 50 is special they'd laugh. He makes music that is appealing. College kids rather hear:

    You can find me in the club, bottle full of bub
    Look mami I got the X if you into taking drugs
    I'm into having sex, I ain't into makin love
    So come give me a hug if you into to getting rubbed

    then:

    You got ID? Put your hands up! You can't park here at this time! Etc.
     
  25. racerx

    racerx Guest

    Nov 23, 2003
    38
    twk, on the one hand you want CS and the rest of us to impressed that you make bundles of cash yet you call 50 a loser though he probably has made more per year lately than you. So the money yardstick doesn't work. (1 for 50)

    But I suppose that M&A bs is so vital to the world that shuffling papers is way better than 50's work. 50cent has never made a dime off of me and never will but I saw him on Letterman one night and he sounded intelligent and he performed very well to impress me and the live audience. (2 for 50)

    He didn't attend harvard at all like we did, but he went thru a lot tougher education growing up in his environment and made it out alive and wealthy. IMO that's 3 for 50.

    I'd say you should unmount YOUR high horse. As far as cops, I could go on forever but most that I have known are damn lucky to be making their incomes and often are corrupt. Isn't pedigree a dog food?
     

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